My flying adventures.

nemodakar

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Chris, die lugraam staan nou op ongeveer 4,300 ure en die enjin het in 2013 'n shock load inspeksie gehad. Die enjin was in 2000 deur die fabriek herbou en ek vermoed die plugs kom al van daai tyd af. Die enjin het nou so 1,150 ure op.
SA Mooney se manne het bevestig dat hulle al in hulle tyd plugs gesien het wat op gewerk was, maar nog soos hierdie van my nie. Mens sal ook nie regtig weet wat deur die jare alles aan die enjin gedoen was nie. Almal dokumenteer nie noodwendig altyd alles, soos wat hulle veronderstel is om te doen nie.

Nou weet ek darem dat al die plugs en injectors reg is en vir amper nog 'n leeftyd sal hou.

Ek is nog nie seker oor more se veiling nie. Ek moet eers die vliegtuig uitsort en ek weet nie of ek dit vandag gedoen gaan kry nie.
Ek het die afslaer gebel om te vra of hy names my sal koop, as ek dit nie kan maak nie. Hy het my egter redelik tot in my fondament geskud toe ek hom vra wat bulle deesdae op die veiling gaan (ek was seker in 2010 laas op 'n bul veiling).
Op die laaste drie veilings wat hy vanaf Februarie gehou het, was die gemiddelde bul pryse as volg:
1. R85,000
2. R67,000
3. R75,000

So, hy het gereken ek kan my regmaak vir ongeveer R70,000 vir 'n goeie bul! :oops:
Dis aansienlik meer as wat ek ingedagte gehad het, of kan bekostig.

Ek sal dus seker maar sommer net hier bly...
Pryse klink reg, dit is ball park wat ons so rukkie gelede betaal het vir n Red Angus bul. Moet by voeg, die bliksem WERK.

Ons het 2 kuddes, 1 op Herbersdale plaas en 1 op Hankey. Die Herbersdale bul kom na ons elke 3 jaar en die Hankey bul word dan verkoop en met die geld koop ons weer een vir daai kant.

So ek reken as ek n bul kan laat werk vir 5 na 6 jaar het hy homself betaal. Mits hy met 50+ koeie oor die weg kan kom.
 
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bought a twin Co many. Years Ago so my son could build twin time B4 applyin for an airline job.Then only 300 hrs of multi needed to apply for an airline job. Never paid for an instructor ,as they also needed twin. Time. Iโ€™m in the U S of A ,,,know our rules have tighten since then .
Son and wife are both Captain with Southwest Air .
Sounds like you have a good airplane there.


Sold the A/C to a man with same Plan ,, 300 hrs for his daughter.
I stick to motorcycles now ,, more affordable
 

chrisl

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Mits hy met 50+ koeie oor die weg kan kom.

50 cows are starting to get hard work!!! Drove past your Hbertsdale place last weekend. Such a shame the new Case tractors sleeps outside!!๐Ÿ˜ฌ
 

nemodakar

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Mits hy met 50+ koeie oor die weg kan kom.

50 cows are starting to get hard work!!! Drove past your Hbertsdale place last weekend. Such a shame the new Case tractors sleeps outside!!๐Ÿ˜ฌ
sal daai manager moet aanspreek, hy het genoeg stoor plek. Die nette het mooi gekom , of hoe se jy? Vir daai kloof wind. Ek het nooit geweet wind kan n stuk water uit n dam waai voor ek nie daar dit gesien het nie.
 

Bike_Buddies

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Sien vandag Hartebeestloop veiling het weer mooi pryse gekry vir bees op veiling ....

 

Tampan

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Nee hel, lyk my ek sal dalk self moet inspring en my bulle begin help met die koeie! :oops:
 

chrisl

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Sien vandag Hartebeestloop veiling het weer mooi pryse gekry vir bees op veiling ....

Ongelooflik wat n tandarts met sy passie doen. (joggie briedenhann)
 

Tampan

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Wednesday, 18 May:
We were up just before 6 and I was planning to leave at 7.
I still needed to top up the aux tanks and maybe the nose wheel. We were at the hangar at 6:30, but YR predicted some fog in the Bothaville area until 9. I decided to rather leave a little after 7 to give the fog time to burn away.

At 7, I called a friend in the area and he confirmed that there were clouds in the Nampo area, but no fog. We were airborne at 7:20 and although we were up against a stiff head wind, the flight was smooth. As we approached Bultfontein, however, we spotted several isolated showers and the cloud base was right at our level, FL095.
My son was flying and at times we had to divert and descend slightly, to avoid the clouds and rain. The Comanche was running really well, with all temps perfectly stable and where they're supposed to be. I was, in fact, even able to close the cowl flaps, for the first time since I bought the Comanche, without the CHT's going above limits.

I listened to the Nampo traffic on the radio and as expected, it was quite busy, with many aircraft flying in. We descended to 6,000 feet and called Nampo tower when 5 miles inbound. ATC instructed me to join an a left hand downwind for runway 28. Similar to every year that I've flown to Nampo, there were aircraft inbound and joining, without being on the correct frequency and as a result, without doing any radio transmissions on the frequency that all other aircraft are on.
The modus operandi is to keep a very good Mark I eyeball out and it really helps a lot when you have one or passengers on board. They keep a lookout for other traffic and informs on the position and routing, while the pilot can focus on the flying part.

We saw such an aircraft, joining in front of us, on a left base for runway 28 while were we abeam the threshold and on downwind. ATC also saw him and I was instructed to slot in behind this aircraft, as number 3 for landing.
Although not preferable, at all, this is not too much of an issue, as long as all pilots are on top of their game. Nampo ATC, as always, are really top notch and they always handle all the traffic exceptionally well.

We landed without issues and the runway was in good shape. The parking area, however, was a different story. It seems that Nampo had some rain the previous night and as I entered the parking area, I could feel the Comanche struggling to move.
A substantial amount of power was needed to keep the aircraft moving. After parking, it was evident by the tracks that the ground was pretty wet.

A few pics to follow of the flight to Nampo...
 

Tampan

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Some pics:
 

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Tampan

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A few pics in the Nampo parking lot:
 

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Tampan

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We had a very nice day at Nampo. The weather was good and as always, you walk your ass off, because there's simply way too much to see in one day.
At around lunch, we headed to the beer garden, where I, as pilot, obviously had to be happy with a Coke.

My son met up with some local friends and as young people do (we also did) he quickly managed to organize a lift back home this morning. So, he stayed behind with his friends at Nampo.
At 14:30, my wife an self were done and we started moving to the parking lot. The weather wasn't looking too good, especially towards the north west.
After a pre-flight, we boarded and while quite a few aircraft were lining up to depart, I decided to complete my run-up at my parking spot. We taxied to the holding point and on reaching, ATC cleared us for take off, using rwy 10.

After take-off, we climbed to FL085. There were, once again, quite a bit of rain in the area and at stages, the Comanche got a good wash. The cloud bases were also right at our level and as in the morning, I had to fly a few dog legs and do a few descends to avoid entering cloud. Conditions weren't too bumpy and we had a bit of a tail wind. Our ground speed averaged 160 kts.

After 1:30, we were home and landed safely. The Comanche, once again, ran super well and it's evident that my recent work on it was really called for and was a success.

I want to visit the Kalahari farm next weekend, before we leave for Namibia. After that, I'll fly it down to Port Alfred to leave it there for a good check-up.
 

Tampan

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A few pics of the return flight...
 

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roxenz

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Great to hear that the Comanche is now happy. It is a very attractive aircraft, and sounds like you are really enjoying flying it Capt. Tampan! ๐Ÿ˜Š
 

Stichhom

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Wednesday, 18 May:
We were up just before 6 and I was planning to leave at 7.
I still needed to top up the aux tanks and maybe the nose wheel. We were at the hangar at 6:30, but YR predicted some fog in the Bothaville area until 9. I decided to rather leave a little after 7 to give the fog time to burn away.

At 7, I called a friend in the area and he confirmed that there were clouds in the Nampo area, but no fog. We were airborne at 7:20 and although we were up against a stiff head wind, the flight was smooth. As we approached Bultfontein, however, we spotted several isolated showers and the cloud base was right at our level, FL095.
My son was flying and at times we had to divert and descend slightly, to avoid the clouds and rain. The Comanche was running really well, with all temps perfectly stable and where they're supposed to be. I was, in fact, even able to close the cowl flaps, for the first time since I bought the Comanche, without the CHT's going above limits.

I listened to the Nampo traffic on the radio and as expected, it was quite busy, with many aircraft flying in. We descended to 6,000 feet and called Nampo tower when 5 miles inbound. ATC instructed me to join an a left hand downwind for runway 28. Similar to every year that I've flown to Nampo, there were aircraft inbound and joining, without being on the correct frequency and as a result, without doing any radio transmissions on the frequency that all other aircraft are on.
The modus operandi is to keep a very good Mark I eyeball out and it really helps a lot when you have one or passengers on board. They keep a lookout for other traffic and informs on the position and routing, while the pilot can focus on the flying part.

We saw such an aircraft, joining in front of us, on a left base for runway 28 while were we abeam the threshold and on downwind. ATC also saw him and I was instructed to slot in behind this aircraft, as number 3 for landing.
Although not preferable, at all, this is not too much of an issue, as long as all pilots are on top of their game. Nampo ATC, as always, are really top notch and they always handle all the traffic exceptionally well.

We landed without issues and the runway was in good shape. The parking area, however, was a different story. It seems that Nampo had some rain the previous night and as I entered the parking area, I could feel the Comanche struggling to move.
A substantial amount of power was needed to keep the aircraft moving. After parking, it was evident by the tracks that the ground was pretty wet.

A few pics to follow of the flight to Nampo...
Thanks for sharing Tampan. I was getting a bit of withdrawal symphons for not seeing new posts on your thread. Really interesting about your recent trip to Bothaville and glad your Comanche is running like a Swiss watch. ;) Does FL085 mean your planned flight level is 8 500 feet above ground? Whom tells you what altitude to fly at - ATC? And how does the ATC handle all the aircraftat Bothaville wanting to land? Do you radio them before departure or call them 10 minutes before landing and do they stack you for safety before landing? Apologies for all the questions..lol Regards.
 

Tampan

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@Stichhom
Thanks, I'm happy to hear that you find the thread interesting.

Regarding altitude or flight level:
SA is divided into airspace sectors, of which each has certain altitude limitations and restrictions. This will depend on where such an airspace is situated - i.e. how far from controlled airports, restricted and danger areas and so on.
Generally, airspace far away from controlled areas only start from 1,500 ft AGL (above ground level). If you fly at or below 1,500 ft, you broadcast on the general frequency, which is 124.8 mHz. This is also the frequency for most uncontrolled airfields in SA. You basically broadcast all your intentions: who you are, where you are and where you are heading.
When arriving at an unmanned field, you will announce from which direction you're inbound from, your estimate for the field, at what altitude you will join and and after doing the wind check, how you will be joining the circuit and which runway you'll be using.

The 1,500 ft limit is called transition altitude. This means that when you climb higher than 1,500 ft AGL, you are entering controlled airspace. The rules are that you then must contact the relevant control center on their designated frequency. They will then give you a transponder squawk code, which upon entering it into your transponder, will enable them to see you on radar.
You then also set your altimeter to standard 1013 hPa and then you are flying on flight levels, NOT altitude. This basically means that all aircraft, which are flying at or above the transition altitude, in the same airspace, will be on the same altimeter setting, which ensures correct altitude spacing between traffic flying on opposite directions. Obviously in order to avoid midair collisions.

So altitude basically refers to the local altimeter pressure setting and your altitude displayed will be the actual height AMSL (above mean sea level). Your height above ground will be whatever the the actual surface level will be in that area.
Flight levels will be displayed according to the standard 1013 hPa altimeter setting and will NOT be your actual height above either MSL or AGL.

Furthermore, flight levels are set out and are to be applied as follows:
If you fly VFR (visual flight rules):
For all compass headings from 0-179 degrees, you will fly at odd plus 500 levels: 1,500; 3,500; 5,500, 7,500 ft and so on.
For all compass headings from 180-359 degress, you will fly at evens plus 500 levels: 2,500; 4,500; 6,500; 8,500 ft and so on.
This results in a 1,000 ft separation between two aircraft flying opposite to each other.

If you fly IFR (instrument flight rules) the same as above applies, except that you will fly at odds or evens, without the plus 500 ft.
0 to 179 degress: 1,000; 3,000; 5,000; 7,000 ft and so on.
180 to 359 degress: 2,000; 4,000; 6,000; 8,000 ft and so on.
So separation between IFR and IFR will be 1,000 ft, VFR and VFR will be 1,000 ft and IFR and VFR will be separated by 500 ft.

This is helpful for them to follow your progress and to warn you of any other traffic which could inflict on your flight path. On reaching the point where you need to descend to the circuit altitude of your destination, or to avoid restricted or other airspace, you will ask the control center permission to descend.
They will comply and normally they ask you to report next when 10 nm inbound to your destination, or when you have the field in sight - this is for uncontrolled fields.

If you are going to enter another sector or controlled airspace enroute, ATC will hand you over to them, on their designated frequency and they will follow you further along your planned route.

The regulations further state:
When intending to land at a controlled field, or when your intended flight path will cross any controlled airspace, you have to file a flight plan.

I'll go into choosing my altitude or flight level and how Nampo is controlled in a next post.
 

Tampan

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How I go about my decision on how high I'm going to fly:
1. Short flights:
On a short flight, it doesn't make sense to climb too high. You can end up having to descend immediately, or maybe even before reaching your intended altitude. Climbing happens at a low air speed and burns a lot of fuel.
So short flight will normally happen at low levels, lower power settings and many times just broadcasting on the general frequency of 124.8

2. Longer distances:
When flying to the Kalahari, for instance, I know that I'll be in the air for at least 2 hours.
The first thing I check are the winds predicted at various altitudes. I normally look for the best wind conditions, from 6,500 - 11,500 ft, be it either head or tail winds. Wherever I find the best tail wind, or the slowest head wind, I will fly.

Flying high, at full power, saves a lot of fuel vs flying low at full power. The alternative is to power back at lower levels to save fuel, but then you also sacrifice air speed.
If I face head winds which doesn't differ much from the surface to altitude, I normally prefer to go high. I will burn less fuel and conditions are normally less bumpy up high.
If conditions on or near the surface are better than up high, regarding a head wind, I'll power back and go low level - i.e. below 1,500 ft AGL.

If poor weather conditions are on the table, cloud cover, cloud bases, possible thunder storm activity, rain and so on will dictate.

Nampo:
Flying to Nampo, in the flight levels, you are controlled by JHB South. When ready to descend, you call them and they will grant permission for the descend.
You are also instructed to call Nampo tower at 20 nm inbound. You will tell them what type you are flying and from which direction you are inbound from. Nampo will give you the QNH setting for Nampo, which is basically the current air pressure at Nampo, which will put you at the correct height AGL and they will instruct you to call again when 5 nm inbound. Remember, when you were in the flight levels, your altimeter was set to 1013 hPa.

When 5 nm inbound, you call them again. This time, things can an do get extremely busy, with many aircraft approaching form all directions.
Depending on your approach direction and also the position of all the other traffic, Nampo tower will instruct you on how and where to join the circuit and at what altitude.
It is normally on either a LH or RH downwind or base leg, for the runway in use. Should there be a congestion, they might instruct you to do a few orbits, at a certain position, relative to the airfield.
Once joined, they might ask whether you are a low wing, high wing, twin, etc. They can't read the aircraft that far out. Once all are in the know who is who and where all are, they will ask you to call next when turning onto final approach, after which they will give you a number for landing. If there are two aircraft in front of you, you'll obviously be no.3 for landing.

The key here is to be honest with both yourself and ATC. NEVER EVER say that you have any aircraft visual if you do not and are actually still looking for them. If you happen to see an aircraft that is not on frequency (this happens), immediately tell ATC so that they can space and separate you safely.
You can also be instructed to extend your downwind, because sometimes, aircraft in both the LH and RH circuits arrive at the field at the same time and end up at the same position in the opposing circuits and they have to accommodate all by spacing them properly. Or, you might be flying a hot ship, with someone in front of you going at half your speed.

Although things can get a bit hectic, I don't know of any incident, ever, at Nampo. Most pilots are normally proficient enough to handle the high workload and the Nampo ATC are always exceptional in running things perfectly smooth.
 

Stichhom

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@Stichhom
Thanks, I'm happy to hear that you find the thread interesting.

Regarding altitude or flight level:
SA is divided into airspace sectors, of which each has certain altitude limitations and restrictions. This will depend on where such an airspace is situated - i.e. how far from controlled airports, restricted and danger areas and so on.
Generally, airspace far away from controlled areas only start from 1,500 ft AGL (above ground level). If you fly at or below 1,500 ft, you broadcast on the general frequency, which is 124.8 mHz. This is also the frequency for most uncontrolled airfields in SA. You basically broadcast all your intentions: who you are, where you are and where you are heading.
When arriving at an unmanned field, you will announce from which direction you're inbound from, your estimate for the field, at what altitude you will join and and after doing the wind check, how you will be joining the circuit and which runway you'll be using.

The 1,500 ft limit is called transition altitude. This means that when you climb higher than 1,500 ft AGL, you are entering controlled airspace. The rules are that you then must contact the relevant control center on their designated frequency. They will then give you a transponder squawk code, which upon entering it into your transponder, will enable them to see you on radar.
You then also set your altimeter to standard 1013 hPa and then you are flying on flight levels, NOT altitude. This basically means that all aircraft, which are flying at or above the transition altitude, in the same airspace, will be on the same altimeter setting, which ensures correct altitude spacing between traffic flying on opposite directions. Obviously in order to avoid midair collisions.

So altitude basically refers to the local altimeter pressure setting and your altitude displayed will be the actual height AMSL (above mean sea level). Your height above ground will be whatever the the actual surface level will be in that area.
Flight levels will be displayed according to the standard 1013 hPa altimeter setting and will NOT be your actual height above either MSL or AGL.

Furthermore, flight levels are set out and are to be applied as follows:
If you fly VFR (visual flight rules):
For all compass headings from 0-179 degrees, you will fly at odd plus 500 levels: 1,500; 3,500; 5,500, 7,500 ft and so on.
For all compass headings from 180-359 degress, you will fly at evens plus 500 levels: 2,500; 4,500; 6,500; 8,500 ft and so on.
This results in a 1,000 ft separation between two aircraft flying opposite to each other.

If you fly IFR (instrument flight rules) the same as above applies, except that you will fly at odds or evens, without the plus 500 ft.
0 to 179 degress: 1,000; 3,000; 5,000; 7,000 ft and so on.
180 to 359 degress: 2,000; 4,000; 6,000; 8,000 ft and so on.
So separation between IFR and IFR will be 1,000 ft, VFR and VFR will be 1,000 ft and IFR and VFR will be separated by 500 ft.

This is helpful for them to follow your progress and to warn you of any other traffic which could inflict on your flight path. On reaching the point where you need to descend to the circuit altitude of your destination, or to avoid restricted or other airspace, you will ask the control center permission to descend.
They will comply and normally they ask you to report next when 10 nm inbound to your destination, or when you have the field in sight - this is for uncontrolled fields.

If you are going to enter another sector or controlled airspace enroute, ATC will hand you over to them, on their designated frequency and they will follow you further along your planned route.

The regulations further state:
When intending to land at a controlled field, or when your intended flight path will cross any controlled airspace, you have to file a flight plan.

I'll go into choosing my altitude or flight level and how Nampo is controlled in a next post.
Thank you Tampan for the comprehensive answers. I am still trying to understand the answers and explanations, refering back to literature makes it understandable for a non-pilot. Now it makes prefectly sense to be a well trained pilot. Not only operating the aircraft in a safe manner, but acting in a safe logical manner for other aircraft around you and people on the ground. I have a few questions regarding the altimeter settings you talked about, but lets leave that for another day. Looking forward to your next posting! Safe flying Mr. T! Regards.
 
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